Hacking the Kinect

When it comes to tech, there are two things I certainly love: Flash, and Kinect. Some clever folks are combining the two with tricky hacks, and the results are nice.

Blitz Agency, a leading marketing/interactive agency here in LA, has a nice post compiling a lot of different hacks used to let Flash work with the motion capture capabilities of the Kinect platform. It’s all certainly far from production-ready, but if you’re a geek who loves experimenting, or if your company needs a new system for a demo or interactive presentation, you should really consider giving this a try.

Flash Kinect Demo from BLITZ on Vimeo.

Blitz details their approach to the problem with this little tech tidbit:

Their interest was piqued after Hector Martin and PrimeSenseâ„¢ released their open-source drivers, resulting in an online demo showing Kinect’s uses through a PC. Having worked with multiple UI technologies over the years, Gedrich and Flomin realized that if they could get Kinect to publish information that any UI platform could support, a slew of developers could use this same code to create breakthrough motion-based experiences using familiar markup languages.

The trick? A simple socket server. Using a C++ application to send all the skeleton data to a socket server, they were able to connect other technology to the socket, enabling use of the data.

Ah, socket servers. The old standby for hacking Flash on devices đŸ™‚

If you want to get into the code, hit up Blitz’s blog post on Flash + Kinect

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